Chapter 3 (a:4): Business Services: Engineering

Section

Improvements Implemented Since Last IAP

Current Entry Requirements

Further Improvements Planned

 

Operational Requirements

 

 

 

 

 

A professional engineering association exists under provincial and territorial legislation in each of the ten Canadian provinces and three territories. These associations have all the necessary responsibility and authority to govern the profession and its practitioners within its jurisdiction. Although the provincial statutes are revised independently of each other, and although there are many differences among them, the key elements of these statutes are essentially the same.

 

More detailed information is available from the website of the Canadian Council of Professional Engineers (http://www.ccpe.ca/).

 

 

 

Licensing and Qualification Requirements of Service Providers

 

 

 

An MRA has been signed for engineering services in the NAFTA as described in the current entry requirements.

 

Each province requires anyone practicing engineering to be a registered professional engineer (P.Eng.), whether the work is performed as an employee for industry or government or is provided as a consultant to the public. In some jurisdictions, there are additional registration requirements beyond the P.Eng. for certain categories of work.

 

Professional registration is available to those individuals who have met the requirements with respect to academic qualification, language competency, satisfactory experience and knowledge of professional practice and ethics, and who are of good character.

 

While a number of provinces maintain residency and local presence requirements for practice under a permanent license, all provinces have procedures for temporary licensing of foreign non-resident

engineers, none of which imposes any form of residency or local presence requirements.

 

The Washington Accord, signed in 1989, recognizes the substantial equivalency or comparability of engineering education courses leading to the first professional degree or basic education in engineering (the "Accredited Engineering Degree"). However, this accord, to which eight countries are signatories (Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, United Kingdom, United States, Hong Kong/China, and South Africa) does not address the mutual recognition of professional credentials.

 

Under the NAFTA (North America Free Trade Agreement), a mutual recognition agreement (MRA) for temporary and permanent licensing of engineers, recognizing professional qualification, was signed by Canadian and Mexican federal authorities but remains to be ratified by US states except Texas. This agreement provides mutual recognition for engineers from signatory partners.

 

All provinces have procedures for temporary licensing of foreign non-resident engineers, none of which imposes any form of residency or local presence requirement. Temporary licenses are valid for one year and are renewable. The only difference between a permanent licence and a temporary licence is that the former affords the holder the right to participate in the governance of the profession.

 

More detailed information is available from the website of the Canadian Council of Professional Engineers (http://www.ccpe.ca/) and from the document entitled “The Canadian Engineering Services Industry”.

 

 

 

Foreign Entry

 

 

 

Elimination of citizenship requirement for accreditation in Quebec

 

Elimination of permanent residency requirement for accreditation in Nova Scotia

 

Specific commitments in this area, including some limitations on market access and on national treatment by certain provinces, are set out in Canada's GATS Schedule.  In the engineering and integrated engineering service industries, market access for the cross-border supply, consumption abroad and the presence of natural persons is limited in British Columbia, Newfoundland, Alberta, Ontario and New Brunswick by the requirement for engineers to be permanent residents for accreditation purposes. In Manitoba, consulting engineers are required (for cross-border supply and consumption abroad) to establish a commercial presence for accreditation.

 

More detailed information is available from the website of the Canadian Council of Professional Engineers (http://www.ccpe.ca/) and from the document entitled “The Canadian Engineering Services Industry”.

 

 

 

Discriminatory Treatment/

MFN

 

 

 

Elimination of citizenship requirement for accreditation in Quebec

 

Elimination of permanent residency requirement for accreditation in Nova Scotia

 

Specific commitments in this area, include certain limitations on market access and on national treatment by certain provinces, In the engineering and integrated engineering service industries, market access for the cross-border supply, consumption abroad and the presence of natural persons is limited in British Columbia, Newfoundland, Alberta, Ontario and, New by the requirement for engineers to be permanent residents for accreditation purposes. In Manitoba, consulting engineers are required (for cross-border supply and consumption abroad) to establish a commercial presence for accreditation.