Chapter 5 : Standards[1] and Conformance

 

Objective

 

APEC economies will, in accordance with the Declaration on APEC Standards and Conformance Framework and with the Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT Agreement) and the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS Agreement) attached to the WTO Agreement:

 

a.                   align their domestic standards with international standards;

 

b.                  endeavour to actively participate in international standardization activities;

 

c.                   promote good regulatory practice for the preparation, adoption and application of technical regulations in the APEC region;

 

d.                   achieve recognition of conformity assessment including mutual recognition arrangements in regulated and voluntary sectors;

 

e.                   promote cooperation for technical infrastructure development to facilitate broad participation in mutual recognition arrangements in both regulated and voluntary sectors; and

 

f.                    ensure the transparency of the standards and conformity assessment of APEC economies.

 

 

Guidelines

 

Each APEC economy will:

 

a.         continue alignment of domestic standards with international standards in the priority areas which the SCSC will identify for alignment in the short to medium term in pursuing this goal;

 

b.         participate actively in the international standardization activities of international standardizing bodies and encourage relevant bodies in their economy to participate in the international standardizing bodies accordance with the rules and procedures of these organisations;

 

c.         consider to pursue trade facilitation in information and technology products;

 

d..        participate[2] in recognition arrangements[3] of conformity assessment including mutual recognition arrangements in regulated sectors through:  (i) the development of bilateral, multi-sectoral recognition arrangements, which might, at a later stage, provide the basis for plurilateral arrangements; and (ii) the development of plurilateral recognition arrangements in particular sectors;

 

e.         encourage relevant bodies in their economy to participate in work programs of the five Specialist Regional Bodies[4] and to participate in recognition arrangements3 of conformity assessment including mutual recognition arrangements in the voluntary sectors;

 

f.          improve and maintain the level of their technical infrastructure to facilitate broad participation in recognition arrangements in both the regulated and voluntary sectors, with the SCSC supporting the development of technical infrastructure through economic and technical cooperation, where needed, to improve calibration and testing facilities and the training of personnel, in pursuing this goal;

 

g.         continuously strive to increase transparency of their standards and conformance requirements by means of facilitating the dissemination of such information through publications and electronic homepage and publicizing the availability of these means; and

 

h.         consider participation in:

(i)         the Treaty of the Metre (La Convention Du Metre); and 

(ii)         the Treaty of OIML (La Convention Instituant Une Organisation Internationale De Metrologie Legale)

              in accordance with the rules and procedures of these treaties

 

 

Collective Actions

 

APEC economies will take Collective Actions with regard to standards and conformance in the following four areas:

 

ALIGNMENT WITH INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS AND ACTIVE PARTICIPATION IN INTERNATIONAL STANDARDIZATION

APEC economies will:

a.         continue identifying additional priority areas for alignment with international standards;

b.         continue to report on the progress in their alignment plans every year;

c.         conduct a comprehensive review of their alignment work in 2005; and

d.         continue to promote active participation in international standardization activities.

 

Good Regulatory Practice

APEC economies will:

continue to update the consolidation of materials in the Good Regulatory Practice Database as well as to investigate means of enhancing regulatory practice in the APEC region through a program of case studies and seminars with a particular focus on performance-based regulations and sector-specific good practices. 

 

RECOGNITION OF CONFORMITY ASSESSMENT

APEC economies will, in cooperation with relevant Specialist Regional Bodies, where appropriate:

a.         review the implementation and use of mutual recognition arrangements;

b.         continue to consider mechanisms to facilitate the recognition of conformity assessment results;

c.         review and improve the effectiveness of the APEC Mutual Recognition Arrangement on Conformity Assessment of Foods and Food Products, the Arrangement for the Exchange of Information on Toy Safety, the APEC Arrangement for the Exchange of Information on Food Recalls, and the APEC Mutual Recognition Arrangement on Conformity Assessment of Electrical and Electronic Equipment by, among others, looking into the possibility to adopt an information technology management system; 

d.         implement the work program on trade facilitation in information technology products, by 2005  in the case of industrialized economies and by 2008 in the case of developing economies; and

e.         encourage establishment of and participation in a network of mutual recognition arrangements in the voluntary sector by 2005.

 

COOPERATION ON TECHNICAL INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT
APEC economies will:

a.                   undertake projects for the implementation of the Mid-Term Technical Infrastructure Development Program; and

b.                  conduct a comprehensive review on implementation of the above program after 2005; 

 

TRANSPARENCY
APEC economies will:

a.         update the APEC Contact Points for Standards and Conformance Information, which have been uploaded to the APEC Homepage;

b.         develop and keep current the database on conformity assessment operators and their activities/service offered and establish an APEC Cooperation Center for Conformity Assessment; and

c.         promote the transparency of regulatory systems and standards by maintaining appropriate and accessible information date basis, including Directory of Food Trade Contacts in the Directory of Food Trade Contacts.

 

OTHER ACTIVITIES

APEC economies will:

a.                   pursue closer cooperation with the Specialist Regional Bodies in line with a Statement of Commitment to Mutually Agreed Objectives;

b.                  monitor the developments within the WTO Committees on the Technical Barriers to Trade and Sanitary and Phyto-Sanitary Measures, as well as undertake projects for the implementation of the APEC Strategic Plan on WTO-Related Capacity Building;

c.                   pursue better coordination with other APEC fora; and

d.                   implement the reform of the SCSC through the rationalization of its agenda, priority setting exercise and better coordination with other groups. 

 

The current CAP relating to standards and conformance can be found in the Standards and Conformance Collective Action Plan.

 

Canada’s Approach to Standards and Conformance in 2003

 

Canadian policy is to adopt international standards whenever possible and appropriate, and to encourage all economies to participate in the development and use of voluntary standards, consistent with the WTO Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) and the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS). The Regulatory Policy of the Government of Canada requires adherence (Policy Requirement No.5) to the provisions of these international Agreements. Implementation of the TBT and SPS Agreements forms the foundation for Canada’s policy approach to addressing standards related barriers to trade, in particular for technical regulations under Article 2 of both the TBT and SPS Agreements, and for voluntary standards under Annex 3 of the TBT.

The Standards Council of Canada (SCC), a federal crown corporation operating at arms length from government, promotes the adoption of international standards through its National Standards of Canada (NSC) program. The majority of new National Standards of Canada are adopted or adapted from international standards.

The SCC also operates a national accreditation program for organizations involved in a wide range of conformity assessment activities and promotes international recognition of conformity assessment as a means for eliminating technical barriers to trade. Canada operates a national accreditation program for standards development organizations. Canada addresses conformance related barriers to trade through the application of Article 5 of the TBT Agreement and Article 8 of the SPS Agreement.

Canada’s Regulatory Policy (http://www.pco-bcp.gc.ca/raoic
s-srdc/reg-pol/reg-pol_e.htm
)

WTO: Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade (http://www.wto.org/english/doc
s_e/legal_e/17-tbt.wpf
)

WTO: Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (http://www.wto.org/english/doc
s_e/legal_e/15-sps.wpf
)

Standards Council of Canada (http://www.scc.ca)

 

For more information, please contact:

Technical Barriers and Regulations Divison (EAS)

Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade

eas@dfait-maeci.gc.ca

 

 

 

 

                 

 


Chapter 5: Canada’s Approach to Standards and Conformance in 2003

 

 

Section

Improvements Implemented Since Last IAP

Current Approaches to Standards and Conformance

Further Improvements Planned

 

 

Alignment of standards with international standards where appropriate

 

 

Of the 222 National Standards of Canada approved by the Standards Council of Canada (SCC) in 2002/2003, 59% were adopted from or based on international standards.

 

Canada submited an update of its Statement on the  Implementation and Administration of the Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade

(under Article 15.2) in 2002.

 

 

Canada’s Regulatory Policy (1999) directs regulators to comply with TBT (Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade) and SPS (Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures) obligations.  Canada’s policy is to adopt international standards whenever possible and appropriate.

 

In 1996, Canada issued a notification under Article 15.2 of the TBT Agreement that it complied with its provisions.

 

In 1999 the SCC notified acceptance of Annex 3 of the TBT Code of Good Practice. 

 

Further information on the TBT and SPS agreements is available on the World Trade Organization (WTO) website:

 

http://www.wto.org/english/doc
s_e/legal_e/17-tbt.wpf

http://www.wto.org/english/doc
s_e/legal_e/15-sps.wpf

 

For further information:

http://www.scc.ca

 

Contacts:

Department Foreign Affairs and International Trade - Technical Barriers and Regulations (eas@dfait-maeci.gc.ca)

Kevin McKinley, Director, Standards (kmckinley@scc.ca)

David Shortall, Manager, International Trade (dshortall@scc.ca)

Where appropriate, Canada will continue to encourage further alignment of its national standards with international standards.

 

 

 

 

Alignment of standards with international standards in priority areas agreed by the SCSC

 

 

No changes.

Canada has aligned as follows:

 

- Medical gloves: aligned with the relevant ISO standards.

 

- There are plans to move towards IEC-based standards with respect to televisions, radio and its parts and video apparatus, products.

 

- Machinery (industrial automation systems and integration): the relevant ISO standards have not been adopted by the National Standards Systems of Canada but are used by Canadian industry.

 

- Refrigerators: aligned with the following IEC/CISPR standards: IEC 60335-1, IEC 60335-2-24.

 

- Air conditioners: aligned with the following IEC/CISPR standards: IEC 60335-1, IEC 60335-2-34, IEC 60335-2-40.

 

- Televisions: not aligned with any of the relevant IEC/CISPR standards.

 

- Radio and its parts: not aligned with any of the relevant IEC/CISPR standards.

 

- Video apparatus: not aligned with any of the relevant IEC standards.

 

For further information:

http://www.scc.ca/standards/in
dex_e.html

 

Contacts:

ISO:  Joe McMahon (jmcmahon@scc.ca)

IEC:  Mike Bourassa (mmbourassa@scc.ca)

Where appropriate, Canada will continue to encourage further alignment of its national standards with international standards.

 

 

Active participation in the international standardisation activities of international standardizing bodies

 

 

Canada (SCC) has increased its P-Status from 423 Technical and Subcommittees (TC/SC) in 2001 to 434 in 2002.

 

Approximately 4,000 Canadians participate on these international committees.

Canada (SCC) actively participates in international standardization activities. Canada (SCC) holds P-Status on 434 committees and O-Status on 122 committees.

 

Technical Committees and Working Groups:

Canadians are Chairs of 26 technical committees (TC) and subcommittees (SC). Canada provides the Secretariat for 25 TCs and SCs and is responsible for convening 89 WGs.

 

Canada holds the Chair and Secretariat positions for ISO TC 176 (Quality Management and Quality Assurance) and TC 207 (Environmental Management), which are responsible for the development of the ISO 9000 and ISO 14000 series of standards.

 

Canada is involved as a member of IEC's Asia-Pacific steering group, which provides a forum for developed and developing economies in the region to establish commom positions for issues before IEC's policy and management committees.

 

The SCC participates in the three policy development committees of ISO - CASCO, COPOLCO and DEVCO. The SCC participates in 13 CASCO WGs. The SCC is convenor of ISO/CASCO WG 22, which is revising ISO/IEC Guide 60, Conduct of Good Practice for Conformity Assessment.  The SCC participates in five COPOLCO WGs.

 

For further information:

http://www.scc.ca

 

Contacts:

ISO: Joe McMahon (jmcmahon@scc.ca) 

IEC: Mike Bourassa (mmbourassa@scc.ca)

Canada will continue to actively participate in international standardization activities.

 

 

Participation in plurilateral recognition arrangements of conformity assessment in the regulated sector

 

 

No new arrangements.

Canada has endorsed and is participating in the APEC MRA on Conformity Assessment of Telecommunications Equipment.

 

APEC MRA on Conformity Assessment of Electrical and electronic Equipment: Canada has not implemented the APEC Electrical MRA.

 

The APEC Automotive Dialogue Steering Committee discussed a proposal for an ASEAN mutual recognition agreement (MRA) to complement and facilitate the implementation of the ASEAN Free Trade Agreement (AFTA).  As a member of the APEC Automotive Dialogue, Canada supports the discussion and views this as a useful tool for trade facilitation in the region.

 

Contact:

Phil Calvert, Deputy Director, Technical Barriers to Trade (mailto:phil.calvert@dfait-maeci.gc.ca)

Canada will continue to pursue MRAs with Asia-Pacific economies in plurilateral arrangements where appropriate.

 

 

Participation in bilateral recognition arrangements of conformity assessment in the regulated sector

 

 

No new arrangements.

The negotiation of mutual recognition agreements (MRAs) is one element of Canada’s trade liberalization effort.

 

Canada submitted a policy framework paper on mutual recognition activities to the WTO TBT Committee (2001)

http://docsonline.wto.org/ (Search for G/TBT/W/167)

 

Contact:

Phil Calvert, Deputy Director, Technical Barriers to Trade (phil.calvert@dfait-maeci.gc.ca)

Where appropriate, Canada will continue to pursue MRAs with Asia-Pacific economies in multilateral and bilateral contexts.

 

 

Participation in recognition arrangement of conformity assessment in the voluntary sector

 

 

Canada (SCC) signed the Interamerican Accreditation Cooperation (IAAC) MLAs for QMS and Laboratories in October 2002.

 

 

The SCC is a participant in the following MRAs, MLAs, and MoUs:

 

PAC (Pacific Accreditation Cooperation) MLA for quality management systems (QMS) (1996).

 

ANSI (American National Standards Institute) MoU for cooperation regarding the harmonization of standardization and conformity assessment activities (1991).

 

Japan Accreditation Board for Quality Systems Registration MoU for QMS (1994).

 

International Auditor Training and Certification Association (IATCA) MoU (1996).

 

ANSI / RAB (Registrar Accreditation Board) MRA for QMS registrars (1997). 

 

IAF (International Accreditation Forum) MRA for QMS (1998).

 

NORAMET (North American Metrology Cooperation) MRA (1999).

 

IAAC (Interamerican Accreditation Cooperation) MoU for laboratory, QMS, EMS and certification procedures (2000)

 

ILAC (International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation) MRA for laboratories (2000).

 

APLAC (Asia-Pacific Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation) MRA for laboratories (2000).

 

NACC (North American Calibration Committee) MoU (2001).

 

NACLA (U.S. National Cooperation for Laboratory Accreditation) MoU for laboratory accreditation (2001).

 

IAAC MRA for Laboratories and QMS (2002).

 

For more information: http://www.scc.ca/igat/mra_e.p
df

Canada (SCC) is expected to be a signatory of the PAC MLA for EMS and product certification.

 

The ILAC/APLAC peer evaluation of the SCC on the MRA for Laboratories is scheduled for May 2004.

 

 

Improve and maintain level of technical infrastructure

 

 

 

 

Canada has a modern, fully developed technical infrastructure system, permitting engagement and participation in arrangements for the mutual recognition of conformity assessment in both the regulated and voluntary area.

 

The SCC operates several accreditation programs including testing and calibration laboratories, certification bodies, quality and environmental management systems, registration bodies, and auditor course providers and certifiers.

 

Contacts:

Pat Paladino, Director, Conformity Assessment (ppaladino@scc.ca)

Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade - Technical Barriers and Regulation (eas@dfait-maeci.gc.ca)

 

Canada (SCC) will introduce two new programs in 2003:

 

A Program for the Certification of Personnel based on the new international standard ISO 17024 (General requirements for bodies operating certification schemes for persons).

 

An Inspection Body Accreditation Program based on ISO/IEC 17020 (General criteria for the operation of various types of bodies performing inspection).

 

 

 

Identification of specific requirements, assistance and/or activities for technical infrastructure development

 

 

 

No action required

 

 

Canada is capable of providing technical assistance in a variety of ways on a range of aspects of technical infrastructure related to standards and conformance activities. Canada will give positive consideration to specific requests for technical assistance.

 

Assistance provided by Canada is generally delivered through its own standards and conformance infrastructure bodies and through their participation in the activities and programmes of the Specialist Regional Bodies.

 

 

 

Canada will continue to undertake activities to improve its technical infrastructure, and those of APEC economies.

 

 

 

 

Provision of assistance for the improvement of other economies’ technical infrastructure

 

 

To assist Latin American countries with the dissemination of WTO TBT and SPS notifications to domestic stakeholders, the SCC developed a Spanish version of Export Alert! Bolivia will be the first Spanish-speaking country to use the service.

 

In August 2003, SCC staff gave a presentation on Participation in the International Standardization Process at the PASC conference on international standardization in Vietnam.

 

Canada actively considers technical assistance requests from APEC developing member economies.

Canada will continue to undertake technical assistance activities.

 

In 2003-2004, the Spanish version of Export Alert! will be marketed to Enquiry Point contacts in Spanish-speaking countries that expressed interest in the product.

 

The SCC will be involved with the PAC MLA Readiness Project in Environmental Managements Systems.

 

 

 

Participation in Specialist Regional Bodies[5] activities

 

 

The SCC hosted the APLAC General Assembly in 2002.

 

The SCC is an active member of:

 

APLAC and its  MLA Advisory Committee and Technical Committee

Contact: Joanne Dupont (jdupont@scc.ca)

 

Pacific Accreditation Cooperation (PAC) where Canada is the Vice-Chair and participant on five working groups. 

Contact: Elva Nilsen (enilsen@scc.ca)

 

Pacific Area Standards Congress (PASC)

Contact: Kevin McKinley (kmckinley@scc.ca)

 

Canada (National Research Council) is an Associate Member of the APMP.

Canada will continue to be an active participant in these regional bodies.

 

 

 

 

Continuously strive to increase transparency of their standards and conformance requirement

 

Export Alert! has generated much interest among World Trade Organization member countries as a system for the dissemination of WTO TBT and SPS notifications to a country’s domestic stakeholders.  In 2002/2003, the service was marketed to several countries that enquired about hosting arrangements with the SCC for the delivery of Export Alert! in their respective countries, including countries in South East Asia.

 

In 2002, Export Alert! sent 1,400 notifications to users, and as of July 2003 has sent more than 1,000 notifications to users in 2003.

 

In 2002/2003, the SCC launched the following electronic tools:

 

§         RegWatch is a new SCC service that is a one-stop information source for those interested in tracking technical standards referenced in Canadian federal legislation. 

http://www.scc.ca/online/regwa
tch_e.html

 

§         Standards Alert! provides users with an e-mail notification when the Canadian or international standards they are tracking are amended, withdrawn or a later edition is issued.

 

§         The Consumer Product Safety Legislation in Canada: An Introductory Guide outlines who regulates which aspects of product safety in Canada. The guide is useful to consumers, businesses and regulators. http://www.scc.ca

 

The SCC's Technical Document Centre is Canada's most complete collection of Canadian, foreign and international standards.  The Centre continues to update its inventory to provide its standards collection in electronic format for users, 95% which is in electronic format.

 

Canada has a transparent and open standards and regulatory system. Information on standards development activities is publicly available and participation in standards development bodies is open to both Canadians and non-residents. Proposed regulations at the federal level are published in advance in the Canada Gazette, Part I, while their adopted counterparts are published in Canada Gazette, Part II.

 

Launched in 1999, Export Alert! is a free e-mail notification service to help Canadians keep abreast of Canadian and international regulatory changes. The service gives access to the full texts of draft regulatory measures and the opportunity to comment on the changes.

 

In 2001, the SCC released an enhanced version of Export Alert! that enables users to monitor regulatory developments in selected countries, to receive HTML notifications, and to request regulatory texts more easily.  The number of users is 1,200.

 

http://www.scc.ca/online/expor
t_e.html

Contact: Andrea Spencer (aspencer@scc.ca)

 

The SCC operates a bilingual information service that responds to technical enquiries on standards, technical regulations and conformity assessment procedures in Canada and abroad.

 

http://www.scc.ca

Contact: Tanya Connolly (tconnolly@scc.ca)

 

 

 

The SCC is commited to developing web-based products to meet market needs including:

 

§         An updated version of Standards Alert! will be available focusing on improvements to search capabilities (Fall 2003).

§         Reg Alert!, an email notification service associated with the RegWatch database (2004).

§         A new database driven search capabilities to be implemented for Canadian standards (2004).

§         Further improvement of Export Alert! to allow for refined tracking in areas of interest, as well as to encourage and facilitate the submission of users’ comments on regulatory changes.

 

 

 

To raise awarenes and access to the WTO/TBT Enquiry Point, in collaboration with Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, the SCC is working on a trilingual North America Free Trade Agreement Enquiry Point brochure.

 

The SCC Web Site redesign will be launched in Fall 2003.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Participate in relevant international fora

 

 

The SCC hosted the ISO Networking Conference in May 2003.  A pre-conference workshop introduced registrants to the International Classification for Standards (ICS), a system for sorting standards and classifying them in libraries and other databases.

 

The SCC was actively involved in the ISO Council Developing Country Task Force (DCTF), which was formed to develop an action plan to engage developing countries in standardization activities.

 

 

The SCC is an active member of the following:

 

ILAC (International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation) since 1966, and members of Accrediation Policy Committee, Technical Accreditation Issues Committee, Joint IAF and ILAC Arrangement Management Committee, and three working groups.

 

IAF (International Accreditation Forum) Executive Committee, chair of two committees, and a member of six task forces and working groups.

 

ISO (International Organization of Standardization) since 1972, and members of the ISO General Assembly, Council, and Technical Management Board.

 

IEC (International Electro-technical Commission) since 1911, and members of Council Board, Conformity Assessment Board and Standardization Management Board.

 

Canada (National Research Council) observes the Convention du Metre, and actively supports the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM).

 

Canada (National Research Council) is a Member State and actively participates in the activities of the International Organization of Legal Metrology (OIML).

 

Since its inception in 1962, Canada has been a full and active participant in the CODEX Alimentarius Commission and its subsidiary bodies.

 

 An International Telecommunication Union Member State since 1932, Canada enjoys a position of influence in the Union and promotes our nation's best practices and encourages the interoperable use of our networks and wireless systems on a global scale.

 

Founding member of the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development)

 

 

The SCC will continue to participate in international fora.

 

The SCC is taking a more proactive role in hosting regional and international events.  In 2003/2004, the SCC will host the IEC annual general meeting, and numerous ISO/IEC sub-committee and tehncial committee meetings.

 

 

Other activities

 

 

In January 2003, the SCC hosted the Canadian Leadership Forum to provide increased outreach and dialogue opportunities between the CSS and its leaders of technical and advisory committees.

 

Canada is an active participant in the Third Triennial Review of the TBT. A paper on Canada’s Approach to Voluntary Conformity Assessment was submitted.

 

The SCC completed on-site audits and issued and the first full re-accreditation of all four of Canada’s Standards Development Organizations (SDOs).

 

The SCC Task Force on Innovation Funding continues to examine new approaches to fund the expensive work of standardization.

 

Training workshops by the SCC continue to be introduced including Building a Better Understanding of the IEC and ISO.

 

 

The launch of the Canadian Standards Strategy provides direction to guide Canada's standardization activities. For more information:  http://www.scc.ca/canstrategy/
index_e.html

 

In 2000, the SCC adopted ISO/IEC 17025 as the basis of its laboratory accreditation program, replacing ISO/IEC Guide 25.

 

The new ISO/IEC Guides 65 and 66 were adopted by the SCC as the basis for its accreditation programs for product certification bodies and EMS registrars.

 

In 2001, the SCC launched a Volunteer Program to ensure sustained, effective volunteer representation within the Canada's National Standards System.

http://www.scc.ca/volunteer/in
dex_e.html

Contact: Lynne Gibbens (lgibbens@scc.ca)

 

The Government of Canada extended the SCC's mandate to allow the SCC to offer accreditation services in the Americas and the Asia-Pacific. This was in addition to a previous extension covering most of Europe.

 

 

Implementation of the Canadian Standards Strategy (CSS) is a key priority, and the SCC is developing a plan to update the current strategy.

 

The 2nd National Standards Systems Conference is planned for November 2004.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 






Improvements in Canada’s Approach to Standards and Conformance since 1996

 

 

Section

Position In Base Year (1996)

Cumulative Improvements Implemented to Date

 

 

Alignment of standards with international standards where appropriate

 

Canada notified the WTO that it was in compliance with the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) Agreement, and in particular with Articles 2.3 and 4. Canada had not yet adopted Annex 3 of the TBT Agreement (1996).

 

Approximately 50% of the National Standards of Canada approved during the year were based on ISO/IEC standards (1995/96).

 

 

 

Canada notified acceptance of Annex 3 of the WTO TBT Agreement (1999).

 

Approximately 78% of the National Standards of Canada are based on ISO/IEC standards (2001/2002).

 

Approximately 59% of the National Standards of Canada approved in 2002/2003 were adopted from or based on international standards. (2002/2003).

 

Canada submited an update of its Statement on the Implementation and Administration of the Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade (under Article 15.2) (2002).

 

 

Contacts:

Phil Calvert, Deputy Director, Technical Baririers to Trade (phil.calvert@dfait-maeci.gc.ca)

Kevin McKinley, Director, Standards (kmckinley@scc.ca)

David Shortall, Manager, International Development (dshortall@scc.ca)

 

 

Active participation in the international standardisation activities of international standardizing bodies

 

 

Canada (SCC) held P (Participant) -status in 358 and O (Observer) -status in 134 ISO and IEC technical committees and subcommittees (1995/96).

Canadians served as secretaries or chairs of over 90 ISO and IEC technical committees, subcommittees, and working groups (1996/97).

 

Canada (SCC) assumed the chairs of ISO TC 176 and ISO TC 207 (1997).

 

Canada (SCC) held P-status in 423 and O-status in 127 ISO, IEC and JTC1 technical committees and subcommittees (2001).

 

Canada (SCC) holds P-status in 434 and O-status in 122 ISO, IEC and JTC1 technical committees and subcommittees (2002).

 

 

Participation in plurilateral recognition arrangements of conformity assessment in the regulated sector

 

 

NOTE: Prior to 1996 there were no plurilateral mutual recognition arrangements on conformity assessment

Canada has endorsed and is participating in the MRA on Telecommunications Equipment (1998).

 

 

Participation in bilateral recognition arrangements of conformity assessment in the regulated sector

 

 

Canada/US MRA on Shellfish signed (1948).

 

Canada/Australia MOU on fish inspection and control systems signed (1993).

 

Canada/New Zealand MOU signed, recognizing the equivalency of each country’s fish inspection and control systems (1996).

Canada signed a MRA with Korea on telecommunications, radio, and information technology equipment (1997). This MRA was subsumed by the 1998 APEC MRA on Telecommunications Equipment. Elements not covered by the APEC MRA have been maintained.

 

Canada/USA MRA on Legal Metrology was signed. The current MRA covers conformity assessment testing of simple electronic weigh scales and their indicators (1997).

 

A new MRA was signed with Thailand, recognizing the equivalency of each country’s fish inspection and control systems (1999).

 

MRA in Legal Metrology with the US is to be extended over time to cover the testing of more complex weighing equipment and some new liquid volume meters, as well as the testing of any new technology such as multiple dimensional measuring machines (1999).

 

 

Participation in recognition arrangement of conformity assessment in the voluntary sector

 

The SCC signed NIST/NAVLAP MRA for laboratory accreditation systems (1994).

 

The SCC signed the Pacific Accreditation Cooperation (PAC) MLA (1996).

The SCC signed the MRA with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the Registration Accreditation Board (RAB) for QMS registrars (1997).

 

The SCC signed the International Accreditation Forum (IAF) MRA (1998).

 

The SCC signed the North American Metrology Cooperation (NORAMET) MRA (1999).

 

The SCC signed the American Association for Laboratory Accreditation (A2LA) MRA for testing laboratory accreditation programs (2000).

 

The SCC signed the Asia-Pacific Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (APLAC) MLA  for laboratories (2000).

 

The SCC signed the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC) MRA for laboratories(2000).  The SCC is no longer maintaining its MRAs with NIST/NVLAP and A2LA because all are members of the ILAC and APLAC agreements.  The NIST/NVLAP and A2LA MRAs were allowed to expire when the APLAC and ILAC agreements were signed.

 

Canada (SCC and the National Research Council of Canada) signed a  MoU establishing the North American Calibration Committee (NACC), formerly the North America Calibration Cooperation (2001).

 

Canada (SCC) signed a MoU on laboratory accreditation with the U.S. National Cooperation for Laboratory Accreditation (NACLA) (2001).

 

Canada (SCC) signed the Interamerican Accreditation Cooperation (IAAC) MLAs for QMS and Laboratories (2002).

 

 

 

 

Improve and maintain the level of their technical infrastructure

Identification of specific requirements, assistance and/or activities for technical infrastructure development

 

 

Canada established accreditation programs with respect to quality managment systems (QMS) standards and environmental management systems (EMS)  standards.

The SCC introduced an EMS accreditation program, an Environmental Auditor Certification program and a QMS accreditation program for Auditor Certifiers to improve technical infrastructure (1998).

 

The SCC received a new mandate, structure, and powers from the Government of Canada which included the authority to enter into agreements in its own capacity with foreign organizations engaged in voluntary standardization (1998).

 

PALCAN, the SCC laboratory accreditation program established Program Specialty Areas in the following testing areas: Environmental, Calibration, Forensic, Information Technology, Security Evaluation and Testing, Medical Gas Agricultural and Food, Fasteners, Good Laboratory Practices and Mineral Analysis (1999).

 

The SCC introduced a program to accredit EMS registrars to register forest companies that conform to the National Standard of Canada for forest management (2000).

 

Expanding on the SCC's accreditation programs, a program for proficiency testing providers was introduced (2001).

 

 

Provision of assistance for the improvement of other economies’ technical infrastructure

 

 

Assistance provided by Canada for the improvement of other economies’ technical infrastructure was generally delivered through its own standards and conformance infrastructure bodies and through their participation in the activities and programs of the Specialist Regional Bodies.

SCC accreditated laboratories participated in 24 APLAC proficiency testing programs (1998-2001).

 

To help Latin American Countries fufill their WTO obligations, the SCC has developed a Spanish version of Export Alert! (2002).

 

The SCC was involved with the PAC MLA Readiness Project. SCC trainers participated in a product certification course, and a 5-day workshop for trainee peer evaluators sponsored by APEC, PAC and EMA (Mexican Accreditation Entity) (2002).

 

Based on ISO/IEC 17025, the SCC and the Canadian Association for Environmental Analytical Laboratories (CAEAL) are working with the Pan American Health Organization to provide accreditation services to water testing laboratories, in order to ensure the provision of reliable, accurate testing of drinking water (2002).

 

CAEAL delivered training on ISO/IEC 17025 to 20 persons from APEC developing economies (2002).

 

 

Participation in Specialist Regional Bodies activities

 

 

Canada participated in the Asia-Pacific Legal Metrology Forum (APLMF) (1996).

The SCC is and will continue to be an active participant in the Pacific Area Standards Congress (PASC) and a member of Asia-Pacific Laboratory Cooperation (APLAC) and Pacific Accreditation Cooperation (PAC) (since 1996).

 

 

Continuously strive to increase transparency of their standards and conformance requirements

 

 

Canada has a modern, open, and transparent standards system. Information on standards activities is publicly available and participation on standards development bodies is open to both residents and non-residents (1996).

 

Canada established a WTO Enquiry Point and proposed regulations that were published in advance of adoption in the Canada Gazette and subject to public comment (1980).

The SCC launched the Standards Information System of Canada (SISC), an on-line service to provide access to domestic and international standards information.  It was designed as a tool for use in the standards development process (1997).

 

The SCC launched Export Alert!, a service that automatically issues an e-mail alert to subscribers whenever foreign governments are proposing changes to their technical regulations (1999).

 

The SCC redesigned its Web site to make it more user-friendly.  An e-commerce capability was added providing the means to introduce information products and services that customers can purchase on the web (2000).

 

Export Alert was updated in 2001 to enable users to more easily monitor regulatory developments (2001).

 

The SCC launched a new service, RegWatch, that monitors changes to Canadian federal legislation for references to Canadian, international and foreign standards (2002).

 

Standards Alert!, a new SCC service, provides users with an e-mail notification when the Canadian or international standards they are tracking are amended, withdrawn or a later edition is issued (2003)

 

The SCC's Technical Document Centre has updated 95% of its current inventory of Canadian, foreign and international standards to electronic format (2003).

 

The SCC's Technical Document Centre is Canada's most complete collection of Canadian, foreign and international standards.  The Centre continues to update its inventory to provide its standards collection in electronic format for users, 95% which is in electronic format (2003).

 

 

 

 

Participate in relevant international fora

 

 

Canada became a member of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) (1911).

 

Canada became a member of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) (1932).

 

Canada is a Member State and actively participates in the activities of the International Organization of Legal Metrology.

 

Canada observes the Convention du Metre and the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIML).

 

Canada became a member of International Organization for Standardization (ISO) (1972).

 

Canada became a member of CODEX Alimentarius Commission since its inception (1962).

 

Canada became a member of the International Accreditation Forum (IAF) (1994).

 

Canada became a member of the International Laboratory Accreditation Conference (ILAC) (1996).

 

 

 

Other Activities

 

 

 

The Canadian Standards Strategy developed by the SCC provides direction to guide Canada's standardization activities (2000). http://www.scc.ca/canstrategy/
index_e.html

 

In 2000, the SCC adopted ISO/IEC 17025 as the basis of its laboratory accreditation program, replacing ISO/IEC Guide 25 (2000).

 

The new ISO/IEC Guides 65 and 66 were adopted by the SCC as the basis for its accreditation programs for product certification bodies and EMS registrars (2001).

 

The SCC became a full member of the Interamerican Accreditation Cooperation (IAAC) (2000).

 

SCC launch of the Volunteer Program to ensure sustained, effective volunteer representation within the Canadian Standards System. The program includes training and an awards program to recognize excellence in standardization (2001 to present).

 

The Government of Canada extended the SCC's mandate to allow the SCC to offer accreditation services in the Americas and the Asia-Pacific. This was in addition to a previous extension covering most of Europe (2001).

 

Canada's first National Standards System Conference was held in March 2002.

 

The SCC completed on-site audits and issued and the first full re-accreditation of all four of Canada’s Standards Development Organizations (SDOs) (2002/2003_.

 

The SCC Task Force on Innovation Funding continues to examine new approaches to fund the expensive work of standardization (2003).

 

 

 

 



[1] “Standards” include mandatory as well as voluntary standards. The term “standards” is used in this document to refer generally to matters covered in the TBT and SPS Agreements

[2] It is recognised that not all member economies have the pre-requisite technical infrastructure to enable them to fully participate in mutual recognition arrangements.  Cooperation among APEC economies to strengthen member economies’ technical infrastructure is therefore necessary (see Guideline (e)).

[3] The term "mutual recognition arrangements" does not necessarily mean an instrument or instruments which creates or create legally-binding international obligations.

[4] Asia Pacific Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (APLAC)

 Asia Pacific Legal Metrology Forum (APLMF)

 Asia Pacific Metrology Program (APMP)

 Pacific Accreditation Cooperation (PAC)

 Pacific Area Standards Congress (PASC)

 

 

 

 

[5] Asia Pacific Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (APLAC), Asia Pacific Legal Metrology Forum (APLMF), Asia Pacific Metrology Program (APMP), Pacific Accreditation Cooperation (PAC), Pacific Area Standards Congress (PASC)