Chapter 3 (k:1) : Transport Services: Maritime

Section

Improvements Implemented Since Last IAP

Current Entry Requirements

Further Improvements Planned

 

Operational Requirements

 

 

 

 

 

Marine transportation policy ensures Canada has a domestic regime in place that promotes efficiency, safety and environmental standards compatible with international practices.  The regulatory framework is shifting from operating the marine transportation system to developing legislation that introduces commercial discipline in the marketplace.  This is being achieved through initiatives such as the Canada Marine Act, the Canada Shipping Act, the Coasting Trade Act, and the Shipping Conferences Exemption Act and the Marine LIabillity Act.

 

The Canada Transportation Agency (CTA) is responsible for the economic regulation of transportation and acts as a forum for the fair hearing of transportation related disputes.  These powers are established under the Canada Transportation Act, the Coasting Trade Act, the Shipping Conferences Exemption Act, and the Pilotage Act."

 

More information is available on the website of the Agency (http://www.cta-otc.gc.ca), the Transport Canada website (http://www.tc.gc.ca) and from the document entitled “Maritime Transportation Services”.

 

 

 

Licensing and Qualification Requirements of Service Providers

 

 

 

 

Many activities in this sector require a licence from either the CTA or Transport Canada. More information is available on the website of the Agency (http://www.cta-otc.gc.ca) the Transport Canada website (http://www.tc.gc.ca) and from the document entitled “Maritime Transportation Services”.

 

 

Foreign Entry

 

 

 

 

Specific commitments in this area are set out in Canada's GATS Schedule. Canada's commitments are limited to providing non-discriminatory access to and use of the following port services: towing and tug assistance; provisioning, fuelling and watering; garbage collection and ballast waste disposal; emergency repair; lightering and water taxi services; ships agencies; customs brokers; stevedoring and terminal services; surveying and classification services. In addition, Canada undertook to provide non-discriminatory access to and use of transport services for the purpose of onward forwarding of cargo.

 

Market access and national treatment commitments cover: customs clearance, freight forwarding, container station and depot services, and storage and warehousing. There is a limitation involving a commercial presence requirement for licensed customs brokers. Canada has not undertaken any sector specific commitments on the provision of auxiliary services through the temporary entry of natural persons.

 

 

 

Discriminatory Treatment/

MFN

 

 

 

 

Canada has no discriminatory restrictions on the provision of international maritime transport services and does not impose restrictions on access to and use of port or onward transportation facilities.